Category Archives: Book Reviews

Here I will present to you reviews I have written about aviation-related books by authors other than myself. The reviews presented here may or may not have been solicited; regardless, you will always get my honest opinion.

I Could Never Be So Lucky Again: An Autobiography of James H. “Jimmy” Doolittle

Jimmy Doolittle (date unknown)

I Could Never Be So Lucky Again: An Autobiography of James H. "Jimmy" Doolittle with Carroll V. Glines This is one of those extremely rare literary pairings where the top man in a field collaborates on his autobiography with a top writer who knows the subject. “Jimmy” Doolittle is regarded by everyone as a seminal figure ...

Operation Iraqi Freedom: What Went Right, What Went Wrong, and Why

Operation Iraqi Freedom: What Went Right, What Went Wrong, and Why

The performance of the American military forces during Operation Iraqi Freedom was absolutely brilliant and despite whatever any post-war analyst might say, the war was decided by airpower. Opposing Iraqi forces were utterly demoralized by the enormous fire power laid down by air power, and were thus unable to cope with the ferocious ground attack ...

Review: The Flying Tiger: Chennault and the 14th Air Force

The Flying Tiger: The True Story of General Claire Chennault and the 14th Air Force in China By Jack Sampson This book was written by a friend of Claire Chennault, and is all the better for it. Jack Samson is a veteran foreign correspondent who served with Chennault in China, and subsequently with the famous Civil Air Transport ...

Review: The Warthog and the Close Air Support Debate

This book should be required reading for every student of military history for three reasons. The first two reasons are alluded to in the title, for author Douglas E. Campbell, a fan of the fabulous A-10 aircraft, provides a balanced portrait of the advantages (many) and disadvantages (relatively few) of the Warthog as he outlines ...

Review: Mission to Berlin

Mission to Berlin is an amazing account of American heroism in the last months of World War II, when American airpower reigned supreme. Germany was beaten but still capable of a vicious defense of its capital, Berlin.  The very scale of the attack defies belief, with more than 1,000 bombers and several hundred fighters launching ...